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Location, location, location

As I was lying in bed last night I started thinking about where┬áSaving Tomorrow is set. So far there are no location keys. In fact, typically, I tend to write things without saying where they are. It’s in a city. In the future. On Earth.

But is that enough? Wouldn’t I gain more by placing it into a more specific setting than leaving it to the readers imagination?

This question is tumbling around in my mind a lot today, and so I’m turning to you, my dear readers, for opinions. What works for you?

I’m tossing around the idea of setting the novel in New Zealand. Because, well, it’s where I am. I love the country, I know it, and it would be nice to write something set locally. I’ve avoided writing local in the past because I haven’t read much set here. It seemed like no-one wanted to know about little old NZ. That perhaps writing it set locally would mean it was more difficult to sell to an overseas market.

This is what happens when you have publishers in NZ telling you that NZer’s don’t read fantasy, don’t read science fiction. When there are so very few places within the country that will so much as look at a piece of speculative fiction with an eye to publishing. So of course, my thinking goes, if you want to sell it to the world, you should use a location more people can identify with. Or don’t specify one.

But is that really the case? I love reading sci-fi set on other worlds. Isn’t that kind of the same thing? As long as there is enough in the story that relates to me as a human being, then I can identify with the characters and connect with the novel. That’s what really matters.

Yet, I am still undecided.

To specify, or not? That IS the question.

So tell me, my lovely readers, what do you think? How much does the setting impact on you? Does it really matter?

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